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Too Much Doomscrolling? Staying Informed While Staying Sane

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Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, climate change, the January 6th insurrection, anti-trans legislation across the country, and a new variant of COVID-19: reading the news can be an unrelenting source of trauma, a hailstorm of stress and anxiety.

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Can bad news give you a hangover? Fasten your seatbelts because the doom isn’t going anywhere.

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“Doom and gloom” is an expression first coined in the 1947 Broadway musical Finian’s Rainbow. It has been a part of our vernacular for nearly one hundred years, but never so consistently as it is today, as we are privy to almost unlimited access to horrific news.

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So what do we do about it?

Scroll Away; Scroll Away!

While some admit it’s a bad habit, and seek balance, its effects can be debilitating for many others. Doomscrolling promotes stress, anxiety, and depression. And it’s not going anywhere, anytime soon.

Advice to decrease Doomscrolling is plentiful: practice mindfulness training, get involved with a charity, perform acts of kindness, or set a timer.

Curbing Addictive Behavior

It’s not leaving dishes in the sink or biting your fingernails: Doomscrolling more closely resembles alcohol, drug, and gambling addictions.

Experts in brain chemistry point out scrolling on your phone can be similar to constantly yanking on a slot machine.

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